Friday, February 5, 2016

Interlude: Read and To Read

If you're curious about the inner workings here at Chez BTRU, I'm happy to take a few moments to talk/write about it. If you've hung out for a while, you realize it's not a regularly updated blog. I stick to reviews of books about popular music and artists here, but as a reader I don't limit myself to this type of non-fiction. I tend to choose books that interest me as a reader and wannabe historian, and as I work in the industry I read to keep up on current releases and "buzz" books. Often that takes me into fiction, outside of this realm. Once I get my hands on a book fitted for this blog, I'm going to give it my full attention.

With this blog, too, I strive to review recent releases - books no more than a year old. So if you've wondered why I haven't reviewed a certain title, say Neil Peart's first books or something else, that's why. In time, though, I'd like to look into older books maybe for round-up posts about a particular topic/artist. There are a few things I'd like to do with this blog to make it more interactive.

For now, though, here's what I've read lately and what you can look forward to in the future:

Read: Frank: The Voice by James Kaplan
OmniLit ~ Amazon

I read the second book of Kaplan's two-part Sinatra bio first (reviewed here). Having done this, I think if you haven't read either book you should read The Voice first if you want to better appreciate it. Reading Sinatra: The Chairman first, I found I enjoyed the second book more because I saw this era of Sinatra's life as more interesting - this despite the rapid drop-off in 80-90s Sinatra history.

In The Voice, there's so much to muddle through and it's not all happy. To me the book didn't really start rolling until he met Ava, and right when it gets to a pivotal moment in his life, the book's over.

If you're really that interested in Frank's first thirty years, pick it up. You may appreciate The Chairman more for it. Rating: C+

To Read: Kill 'Em and Leave: Searching for James Brown and the American Soul by James McBride
OmniLit ~ Amazon

I read McBride's The Color of Water  many years ago. Excellent book. Pick it up if you haven't yet.

From the blurb: Kill 'Em and Leave is more than a book about James Brown. Brown's rough-and-tumble life, through McBride's lens, is an unsettling metaphor for American life: the tension between North and South, black and white, rich and poor. McBride's travels take him to forgotten corners of Brown's never-before-revealed history: the country town where Brown's family and thousands of others were displaced by America's largest nuclear power bomb-making facility; a South Carolina field where a long-forgotten cousin reveals, in the dead of night, a fuller history of Brown's sharecropping childhood, which until now has been a mystery. McBride seeks out the American expatriate in England who co-created the James Brown sound, visits the trusted right-hand manager who worked with Brown for forty-one years, and sits at the feet of Brown's most influential nonmusical creation, his "adopted son," the Reverend Al Sharpton. He reveals the stirring visit of Michael Jackson to the Augusta, Georgia,funeral home where the King of Pop sat up all night with the body of his musical godfather, spends hours talking with Brown's first wife, and reveals the Dickensian legal contest over James Brown's valuable estate, a fight that has destroyed careers, cheated children out of their educations, cost Brown's estate millions in legal fees, sent Brown's trusted accountant, David Cannon, to jail for a crime for which he was not convicted, and has left James Brown's body to lie for more than eight years in a gilded coffin on his daughter's front lawn in South Carolina.

To Read: Fleetwood Mac on Fleetwood Mac Interviews and Encounters by Sean Egan
OmniLit ~ Amazon

I've wanted to get in a Fleetwood Mac book here for some time. I had my hands on Mick Fleetwood's memoir a while ago but for some reason didn't finish it. Will have to try again.

From the Blurb: Fleetwood Mac was a triumph from the beginning—their first album was the UK’s bestselling album of 1968. After some low points—when founder Peter Green left, some fans felt that the band continuing was sacrilege—Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks joined, and the band’s 1977 album Rumoursbecame one of history's immortals, a true classic that remained in the charts for years and public affection forever. In the press, the ethereal Californian Stevie Nicks, the tormented rocker Lindsey Buckingham, the dignified English rose Christine McVie, the blunt-speaking John McVie, and the loquacious Mick Fleetwood have all regularly been astoundingly candid. This collection of interviews across the entirety of Fleetwood Mac’s career features articles from such celebrated publications as Crawdaddy, New Musical Express, Circus,Creem, Mojo, Goldmine, Classic Rock, Blender, and Elle, as well as interviews that have never previously appeared in print. In it, readers will learn the Fleetwood Mac story from the band members’ own mouths, and experience it contemporaneously rather than through hindsight.

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So that's what I have on deck, and of course I'm still waiting for Lita Ford's book...if and when.